Think of your domain name as the business card for your online presence. Because your domain name identifies you to anyone on the Internet, some time and effort should be taken in creating one that is memorable. We recommend selecting a domain name that is simple and descriptive. may seem like a descriptive name, but it’s not easy to remember and would not look good on your business card. is a better choice as it is shorter and just as descriptive.

There are a number of factors to consider when choosing a domain name:

Email Address
A key advantage to having your own domain is you can brand your email with your domain. This means you are no longer dependant on your Internet Service Provider (ISP) for an email address. Regardless of whether you use cable, DSL or fibre optic Internet, you will always maintain the same email.

Search Engines
Search engines use your domain name (along with other variables) to determine what your website is about. Vanity names (, though memorable, do not offer much help to search engines; they describe the person, not what the person does.

Choose a domain that is easy to spell. The longer or more obscure your domain is, the more likely someone will misspell it. Numbers in the middle of your domain can hinder potential site visitors from reaching your website. If you register, register as well to cover your bases.

Choose a domain that will stand the test of time. may have been a great domain prior to the turn of the millennium, but is outdated today. If you are planning on selling your practice down the road, try to avoid a name that limits your relevance. is a great name in Idaho, but does not translate well into a national franchise. If you include your company name in the domain and move to another company, you’re faced with changing a domain name that has been established over time. All your previous marketing efforts will be lost.

Trademarked Words
Avoid trademarked words/names. For example, the word “realtor” is trademarked. “Realty” and “real estate” are good alternatives.